Starting The Day Off Right

I remembered the incredulity as I dropped the kids off at school this morning. The sad scorn I felt for those parents that would send their poor children off to a long day of school without a proper breakfast. They were heavy on my mind, those poor nutrition-less children and the worries that surround them. How could they make it through a day of learning and activity without a good healthy start to the day?

I was thinking about those deprived children because I had just watched in the review mirror as my own kids ate old stale Cheetos from a bag Clara found in the back. I had just thought how odd it was that they’d even want to eat something like that much less in the morning right after – Oh shit!

I forgot to feed my kids breakfast.

I dropped them off, wished them well, figured it was a good thing we never clean the truck and that Clara gets a snack within an hour of getting to school. Made a mental note to be nicer in my head to people because you never know what the circumstances might be and headed to the gas station.

I got out to pump gas and looked down at my slippers.

Moral of the story: Don’t judge, you never know what motherhood may do to you.

Other moral of the story: Some people just don’t do mornings.

Advertisements

11 comments on “Starting The Day Off Right

  1. Julie says:

    Have a good day.

  2. Sharon says:

    I guess the time of day is not too important when judging other people! Who are we to Judge not knowing the circumstances. That is just one of the many important things we have to teach our children. I’m going to quickly mention one of the most important things to teach children (in my estimation and what I told my kids). You don’t need to like everybody and you don’t need to be friends with everybody, but you had better be friendly to everybody. My sermon for the day!! Thanks Jessie for letting me take over your blog for a minute!!

  3. barbtaub says:

    When my first child was born, I was so smug about all the research I’d done, about my knowledge of the right way to do everything. Nobody was allowed near her unless they’d had every vaccination and a note from their doctor attesting to their health. If I could have had them boiled first, believe me I’d have tried.

    By the time Child#2 arrived, I was picking up her pacifier from the ground, licking it off, and sticking it back into her mouth. It would never have occurred to any of us that I would choose their clothes, and my occasional remarks about the way Child#2 seemed to attempt to incorporate every possible color/pattern combo into each day’s outfit were met with fist bumps and high-fives. By Child#4, they were all self-defense cooks who could probably have survived armageddon by making filling meals from the graham crackers and goldfish crackers solidified onto the backseat of any of our cars.

    Looking back at the photos in our family albums, I’m amazed that they all look so healthy and happy—if a bit strangely dressed.

    • Jessie says:

      And they all grew up to be highly functioning adults that still are willing to communicate with you so I feel that gives my kids and I hope! 🙂

      I love hearing your stories from when your kids were younger, it all sounds so… familiar! 🙂

  4. Firewaves21 says:

    I am one of those people who just don’t do mornings. LOL I feel for you…I do.

  5. […] you start sounding exactly like your own mother. Sometimes you find yourself doing things you swore you’d never do (I mean other than sound exactly like your mother). And sometimes you find that you are the only […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s