The Two Lines That Sparked Parallel Lies by Georgia Rose (Guest Post and Book Review!)

I was just two pages into Georgia Rose’s new thriller romance and she had me hooked. I knew her main character was living some sort of lie. But what was it? And when did I get to find out? And what was going on?  From that point on it was hard to put down but, I have this life that does exist outside the written word, so I put it down. And then spent much of the time until I could pick it back up again pondering all the lies and foreshadowing the love and sneakiness the twists and turns the story had taken. I thought long about the supporting characters- I loved the supporting characters. They could each have a book, in fact I’d bet that with the amount of secret backstory they must all have to be so substantial that there are already a book’s worth of material floating around for each of them. I marveled at the complexity of it all and wondered how she came up with such a thing…

And then, lo and behold, look what I found in my inbox. A guest post from Georgia herself answering that very question! Read and enjoy!


Where do your ideas come from? Is a question I have often been asked. Again, it wasn’t until I took up the pen (overly poetic, I know, but indulge me) and started talking to non-writing people (there should be a name for them, don’t you think?) that I found out that non-writing people do not have this crazy imagination stuff going on in their head all the time. Which is weird.
I can’t speak for everyone but my ideas come from many things, something I read, watched, a random thought, an overheard phrase, some wild fantasy that passed through my mind when I was relaxed and daydreaming… ahem… moving on…
Sometimes those tiny thoughts don’t let me go and sometimes they want to be more.

This is what happened with Parallel Lies. I had a thought, an imagining, years ago. Well before the Grayson Trilogy ever popped into my mind. A place, a person, a situation and it stuck with me. This…

‘I hear it, behind me, and to the left. The snap of a twig underfoot and a sharp intake of breath at the indiscretion.’

… was all I had and it was the first line I wrote. I was going to start the book with it and do some sort of time jump back and forward thing. But changed my mind. It’s now where it should be in the natural course of time progression and, so that you’re not just left with that, here is the rest of that paragraph.

‘I hear it, behind me, and to the left. The snap of a twig underfoot and a sharp intake of breath at the indiscretion. He’s here, just as I knew he would be, but I allow myself a small smile of satisfaction knowing he’ll be cursing his mistake. I have no intention of making this easy for him so leave him to come and find me. I still, and although my heart is pounding, blood pumping in my ears until I’m sure he’ll be able to hear it too, I concentrate on making myself small and silent. I am one step ahead of him and plan on keeping it that way.’

The possibilities captured my imagination when I first had that thought, but I did nothing with them for years. Two lines expanded to become a 95K novel (which wasn’t as easy as I just made that sound) and

if it is in anyway intriguing to you the rest of those words are available for you to download right now.

Pre-order Parallel Lies by Clicking Here
But wait! There’s also a Giveaway for you to enter, should you wish!

So where do your ideas come from? I’d love to hear from any writing people (or non-writing, I’d hate to be discriminatory) who come this way with what has made their creative juices flow.

Thank you for inviting me on Behind the Willows, Jessie, it has been a pleasure to visit you and get to chat to your readers.


Thanks for guest posting, Georgia! I don’t know about anyone else but I have my own little narrator who likes to comment on my life as I go through my day, occasionally she makes up a story as well. Sometimes when the narrator is particularly fond of a story she repeats it over and over until I consent and sit down at the keyboard- and suddenly I’ve been blogging for seven years!

P.S. Would I recommend this book? This is the sort of book that I doubt John really wants to read. Bit heavy on the romance, not exactly his jam, but I liked it so much I told him about the whole thing anyway. If you are any kind of romance reader, or like a light thriller with a bit of drama and a bunch of suspense, you’ve got to get your hands on this book!


Georgia Rose is a writer and the author of the romantic and suspenseful Grayson Trilogy books: A Single Step, Before the Dawn and Thicker than Water. A short story, The Joker, based on a favorite character from the series followed and is free to download from Amazon.
Her fourth novel, Parallel Lies, a standalone to be released on 12 September 2017, encompasses crime along with Georgia’s usual blending of genre.
Georgia’s background in countryside living, riding, instructing and working with horses has provided the knowledge needed for some of her storylines; the others are a product of her overactive imagination!
Awards have never been showered upon Georgia but she is the proud holder of a silver medal gained in swimming at the tender age of ten and won Miss Rally Young Farmer (with a sash and everything!) more years ago than she cares to remember.
Her busy life is set in a tranquil part of rural Cambridgeshire in the UK where she lives with her much neglected husband and dog. Their son, currently at university, comes and goes and their daughter, having delighted them all for long enough, has eventually moved out, got married, and is discovering the joys of being all grown up and having a mortgage!


 

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Scotch on the Rocks by Lizzie Lamb

“Romance novels are birthday cake and life is often peanut butter and jelly. I think everyone should have lots of delicious romance novels lying around for those times when the peanut butter of life gets stuck to the roof of your mouth.”

– Janet Evanovitch 

Life had too much peanut butter in it. I needed a birthday cake of a romance novel and, thankfully, Scotch on the Rocks was on the menu.

Why a birthday cake of a romance novel?

Well… because like birthday cake, you aren’t expecting nutrition from your romance novel. You don’t expect your latest romance or slice of birthday cake to make you a better person. And you don’t actually want much of a surprise. “Surprise – your birthday cake has nuts!” Is not something anyone wants to hear.

The comfort of predictability, reliable sweetness, a touch of decadence, and a great big pile of happy… that’s what makes both a good birthday cake and romance novel.

Scotch on the Rocks was a true birthday cake of a romance novel.

The woman is beautiful, but in a girl next door way: Yellow cake.

The man is gorgeous: Chocolate frosting.

And rich: Chocolate ganache frosting.

The banter between the two is witty: Two layers!

The steamy scenes are steamy without being raunchy: Extra big slice!

He, on occasion, wears a kilt: Frosting roses!

There is a super sassy parrot: Sparkler candle!

But then, of course, there is the terrible, everything has to fall apart so they can get back together section.

I hate that part.

It’s like when your husband pretends to steal all your frosting and then gives it back right at the last second. You’re pretty sure that since he hates frosting, he’s going to give it back but it’s always a relief when it’s back on your own plate.  Just in case this is the time he changes his mind.

Sure, it adds some drama to the experience but I don’t actually want drama. I just want to eat my frosting and be happy. It was a relief that, while reading this birthday cake, frosting was merely scooped off my plate with a flourish before I received a wink and it was plopped right back on top!

Would I recommend it? Well… do you like cake?

Rosie's Book Review team 1

 I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I discovered this book because I’m a proud member of Rosie’s Book Review Team!

The Grayson Trilogy by Georgia Rose

Putting down the third book and wiping away tears I mulled things over, trying to pin point just what it was that pulled me in.

What was it that had me reading the last two books of this trilogy in a marathon afternoon into evening read?

It wasn’t the flowery language or exquisitely turned phrases. In fact the language of this book is very simple. Coffee is made, horses are cared for, the thoughts in Grayson’s head are just like thoughts that might be in mine.

Just, normal – stuff.

And I think that was it, what I thought at first was over simplified writing, that was the key. Because when everything goes decidedly not normal, whether for good (the tall, dark, handsome, possessive man, yeah, it totally goes there) bad ( I won’t ruin anything but let’s just say there are baddies and they’ve got guns) or sometimes crazy (again, no spoilers here, but when I tried to tell my husband what was going on and why I couldn’t talk to him even though he’d been at work for the last 12 hours, he raised his eyebrows and told me I read “weird stuff”), it was still believable.

I’d already been riding along in Grayson’s life, for all the everyday mundane things. So when the not so everyday, bordering on crazy, happened, her reactions didn’t surprise me. Of course she did that, of course it was believable (even if when you tell your husband in the kitchen after midnight it’s so not) and of course I was so emotionally involved.

Buckets of tears involved.

Would I recommend it? I’d call this trilogy a tear soaked, romantic adventure. If that kind of thing is your style go pick them up – all of them. They only get better as they go!Rosie's Book Review team 1

 

Playing House by Donna Brown

I can be a bit of a Goldilocks when faced with a new romance novel.

I held this new book in my hand hoping it would strike just the right balance…

That it would be a love story that wasn’t too sappy, but yet not too uptight.

I wished for romantic interludes that kept the bodice ripping to a minimum, but not so much as to be puritanical.

I looked at the cute cover hoping the plot would be realistic, but not to the point of boredom.

I wanted to fall in love with the characters, yet hoped those characters would have plenty of annoying, humanizing faults.

I longed for those characters to grow through painful experiences, but not so much trauma that it becomes hard to read.

And finally, I hoped that this book would know its own length. A story should never stretch itself too long or cut things off short.Rosie's Book Review team 1

Would I recommend it? Yes. This sweetly painful, refreshingly real, novella was, decidedly, just right!

This honest review was given in return for a free copy of the book from its author.

Wild Water by Jan Ruth

It is always sad to read a tale of adultery, divorce and families torn in two, but Wild Water is heartbreaking.

And it’s the husband, Jack, who extends this book beyond the general, wife leaves husband, depression and right into heartbreak territory. He makes a joke, and you want to give him a sad pathetic kind of smile because he’s trying so hard. He loses his temper and makes another poor decision and while you can see the train wreck coming, your gut sort of aches for him anyway.  He helps his family along and you want to give him a hug because he’s managing to think of others even as he’s falling apart in all the ways a man can. Even when his childhood sweetheart arrives on the scene it’s hard not to cringe knowing that that this guy can’t possibly not screw something up.

Would I recommend it? This isn’t a light hearted romp in the hay romance, nor is it a drama with deep wells of prose.  This is something different, a blend of the two, that might have gone awry except for the emotion that Jan Ruth endows Jack with. Jack carries the story and while feeling as though I’ve given myself a sympathy ulcer while reading isn’t always the most enjoyable feeling, it’s undeniably a sign of an author who knows people. And what are books about, if not people?

Rosie's Book Review team 1

This honest review was given in return for a free copy of the book from its author.

An Englishwoman’s Guide to the Cowboy by June Kearns

For the first time ever I was given a copy of a book to review by it’s author. (Actually what happened was Rosie Amber put out a call for volunteer book reviewers and I stuck my virtual hand in the air and said “Me! Me! Pick me!”  – and then the author gave me a copy.)

But when I got the book, I’ll admit, I was a little nervous. Cowboy and Englishwoman romance- it could be awesome, it could be terrible. I’ve exchanged words with a few authors via book reviews before but never before I read the book. What if I hated it? What would I say? What had I agreed to?

Nothing for it, I took a breath, dove in and on the second page surprised myself by snorting out loud in laughter. Worries banished I settled in, ignored everyone I was on vacation with and spent the remainder of the afternoon giggling, snorting and laughing as I thoroughly enjoyed the book!

Would I recommend it? Had you told me that someone could successfully combine Louis L’Amour and Janet Evanovich I would have rolled my eyes. I would have been so, so wrong.

Is the ending a bit too perfect? Yes.

Did it stop my enjoyment of it? Not even a little bit.Rosie's Book Review Challengers 1

I’m the Vampire, That’s Why by Michele Bardsley

I read this book because the title and cover cracked me up:

It’s pretty much what it looks like.

Would I recommend it? I can’t recommend it because then you might read it and think things like “She liked this?! She read this?!” and that would just be embarrassing. But, I will quote Janet Evanovich when she says: “Romance novels are birthday cake and life is often peanut butter and jelly. I think everyone should have lots of delicious romance novels lying around for those times when the peanut butter of life gets stuck to the roof of your mouth.”

Personally I’m not actually sure a person needs lots but one every now and then…

P.S. To answer Johns ever present vampire question- No, these vampires don’t sparkle.