Baby Chicks DO Make Everything Better!

A few years ago my mom broke her arm. Of course, Murphy’s law never to be discounted, that happened to be the day her baby chicks arrived. I picked them up at the feed mill on my way to go help her out, letting them know who I was and why my mom wasn’t there herself. “You bring these right in and put them on her lap” said the woman. “Baby chicks make everything better.”

They didn’t miraculously heal a broken arm that day, but they did bring out a lot of smiles.

Ever since the woman at the feed mill put it into words, I’ve found it to be true. Baby chicks, in many ways, make everything better.

This weekend I had big plans, my brother was going to be visiting and we were going to Get Things Done. The kids had plans with other kids, John had a crazy workout challenge event, it was going to be great. And then my brother hurt his leg (he’ll be fine), the kid plans canceled because it tried to be winter again today (spring will be back soon), John did his event (and had a great time despite the weather) but I was not feeling the “great” that was this weekend.

And then I got a slightly out of the blue offer of 18 baby chicks to be delivered ASAP. After rummaging around outside (in the ice/snow/sleet/rain/wind) for supplies, hauling straw and shavings and digging an extension cord out of the ice, the brooder house was set up and the baby chicks arrived. I stood in the warm brooder house, out of the wind and rain and sleet and snow and ice, looked at my new babies peeping in the straw and suddenly everything was quite a bit better.

But that’s not really how I know baby chicks make everything better.

How I know is this…

A few hours after they arrived Clara, Jane and I all went out to check on (read snuggle) the babies. After a bit I, thinking that I should get something done, left the girls out in the brooder house and spent about an hour in the basement on various chores. I came upstairs and it was suspiciously quiet. Did they go back out? … or… uh oh…

The brooder house has a door with a hook and eye latch on the outside and on the inside. The door, particularly in weather that is trying to make you believe it’s still winter, will not stay closed by itself and baby chicks complain to management when it gets too drafty. The door is always latched, from one side… or the other…

I hustled back out to the brooder house. Sure enough, the door was locked from the outside.  I opened it up and went in, bracing myself for yelling and crying and wondering if my apologies would have to go as far as promises of ice cream and movies. There were Clara and Jane, lounging under the heat lamp. Jane had a half a dozen baby chicks sleeping on her lap, Clara had  a few more along her legs and one tucked under her hair, resting on her shoulder. Clara just looked up at me and said in a voice usually reserved for teenagers, “Really Mom?

Then they ever so slowly shed the chicks from their laps and got their boots and jackets on while Jane excitedly told me how they opened a window so they could yell for me and what their plan was in case the brooder house caught fire while they were locked in it (it totally would have worked by the way). They each gave just one more chick one more snuggle and then they happily pranced off through the sleet to the house.

And that’s how I know that baby chicks make everything better.

 

 

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Spring Always Comes

Spring never slips over the earth in an instant, instead it comes in fits and spurts.

A flower pops up here, while a bit of snow falls there. A chilly day today is followed by blue skies and sun tomorrow as winter slowly cedes to spring.snow drops

This year instead of sharing time, winter and spring are sparring.  The ground’s dusting of snow is quickly burned off by the hot sun, only to be replaced by evening. Warm days are chased with frigid ones. A sunny day is repeatedly interrupted by howling wind and snow. Its a war between the seasons, but I know who will win.DSCN1816-(2sm)

Life always marches on. Spring always follows winter.

The baby chicks are peeping warm and safe out of the biting wind and the daffodils are slowly blooming despite their occasional covering of snow. baby chickNew bees have been installed with plenty of honey to keep them fed until the weather warms and new fruit trees have been planted in spraying snow with fingers crossed.new bees

Spring always wins, but that doesn’t mean winter has to make it easy.

This month we said our first hellos to brand new family, brand new friends.

And this month we said our last goodbyes to others.crocus

Spring always comes, life always goes on, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

Anniversary Baby Chicks

Well Honey,

You gave me this card for our anniversary…baby chick anniversary card

…and I just have to say –

Nice Try.

For starters we’ve been married 12 years and we have I have brought home hundreds of baby chicks. So far, not a single pyro among them.

I’m willing to risk the evil chick for a special anniversary gift because…

…and most importantly….

…I think you are missing the big picture here.

Just imagine – a ROOSTER that could start fires with it’s mind.

rooster starting a fire with it's mind

Buh Bye Raccoons!

Maybe if we are lucky we’ll run across one sometime in our next 12 years!

Love,

Me

Spring Is Here

The sky is overcast.

Rain, or something like it that is colder in a way that’s best not to acknowledge, is spitting down and the spring that seemed imminent just days before has blown away in the cold gusty wind.

Yet the howl of wind and wet is abruptly muffled as the door closes behind you. Replaced by a soft symphony of tiny peeps and a friendly ring of red light and warmth.

baby chick drinking water

Baby chicks, delicate beings that defy everything about a cold spring day.baby chick

Tiny scraps of fluff proclaiming that spring is here.